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  • Crowns are well developed with multiple stems.
  • Well-formed root system, gives the plug the energy to develop both the plant and the bloom.

Three Simple Facts

As popular as Echinacea are, it can be tricky getting them to grow into strong perennials. You have probably seen one single tall stem shooting up over a bare wisp of a plant, or heard about coneflowers not overwintering well.

These and other growing problems can be resolved if you remember three simple facts:

  1. DAY LENGTH IS IMPORTANT
    Echinacea start to emerge when the soil warms up, but once their first leaves emerge they require lots of daylight. They need about 13 hours of continuous daylight (early April in most of the US) or the plants will simply stall out. If your crop just sits there, you planted too early.

  2. THEY REALLY WANT TO FLOWER
    Once they start to actively grow, Echinacea want to bloom. If the crown is well developed, has multiple stems, and the root system is well-formed, then the plug has energy to develop both the plant and the blooms. On the other hand, if the plant is small in early April, it will throw all its energy into the flower stem.

  3. A STRONG START FUELS FAST GROWTH
    It seems obvious, but sourcing a strong crown with multiple shoots and a well-developed root system is a key factor for a robust coneflower. Echinacea grow fast once they get going, especially if they have a strong start.

There is no shortcut for Echinacea–you should start the spring with a bulky crown. We believe all Echinacea benefit from the prior year’s growth, especially with some newer varieties that don’t bulk up quite as well as others.